Home / Marijuana Information / General Marijuana Information

General Marijuana Information

General Marijuana Information

Marijuana is a deciduous plant which grows from seeds. The fibrous section of the plant was (has been replaced by synthetics) used to make rope. The flowering tops, leaves, seeds, and resin of the plant is used by just about everyone to get HIGH.

Normally, the vegetable parts of the plant are smoked to produce this “high,” but they can also be eaten. The active ingredient in marijuana resin is THC (tetahydrocannabinol). Marijuana contains from 1 – 20+ per cent THC (10+ per cent must be considered GOOD dope).

Marijuana grows wild in many parts of the world, and is cultivated in Mexico, Vietnam, Africa, Nepal, India, South America, etc.,etc. The marijuana sold in the United States and comes primarily from, yes, the United States. It is estimated that at least 50 per cent of the grass on the streets in America and Canada is homegrown. The next largest bunch comes across the borders from Mexico, with smaller amounts filtering in from Panama, occasionally South America, and occasionally, Africa. Hashish is the pure resin of the marijuana plant, which is scraped from the flowering tops of the plant and lumped together.

Ganja is the ground-up tops of the finest plants. (It is also the name given to any sort of marijuana in Jamaica.) Marijuana will deteriorate in about two years if exposed to light, air or heat. It should always be stored in cool places. Grass prices in the United States are a direct reflection of the laws of supply and demand (and you thought that high school economics would never be useful). A series of large border busts, a short growing season, a bad crop, any number of things can drive the price of marijuana up. Demand still seems to be on the increase in the U.S., so prices seldom fall below last year’s level.

Each year a small seasonal drought occurs, as last year’s supply runs low, and next year’s crop is not up yet. Prices usually raise about 20 – 75 per cent during this time and then fall back to “normal.” Unquestionably, a large shortage of grass causes a percentage of smokers to turn to harder drugs instead. For this reason, no grass control program can ever be beneficial or “successful.”